LOUISE LE HIR BAND

Sister Town Productions Presents

LOUISE LE HIR BAND

TEXAS TRASH & THE TRAINWRECKS, BLOOD FEUD FAMILY SINGERS

Thu, July 2, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$5.00

This event is 21 and over

LOUISE LE HIR BAND
LOUISE LE HIR BAND
Louise has spent the last handful of years as a fixture on the Tucson music scene, both as a country-tinged singer/songwriter and as the frontwoman of killer reverb-laden psych rock bands. But for the last few months, Louise has landed on the sound she always should’ve had — fronting a rollicking country-psych-glam-pop-swirling-mess-of-awesome project recorded with our good pal, Matt Rendon at Midtown Island Studios.
Sidestreetspodcast.com
TEXAS TRASH & THE TRAINWRECKS
TEXAS TRASH & THE TRAINWRECKS
BLOOD FEUD FAMILY SINGERS
BLOOD FEUD FAMILY SINGERS
D.G. Scherrer is a singer-songwriter and award-winning poet from Phoenix, AZ. He began writing and singing songs when he was twelve years old, as the front man for a junior high school punk band. Since then he has become something of a songwriter's songwriter, crafting dark, catchy, lyrically sophisticated tunes in the tradition of Leonard Cohen and Townes Van Zandt. Still, the bite and immediacy of punk remains apparent in his songs, as well as in the sheer volume of his voice when he roars a chorus.

Scherrer draws heavily on older American music forms, particularly blues, gospel and country. But this is no exercise in nostalgia or retro kitsch. Instead, we hear these idioms reinterpreted with a more aggressive sensibility, imbued with more fire and snarl, stripped of whatever innocence they may have had. The tones become darker, with menacing, even violent, undercurrents. A certain film noir ambience haunts the music, though never dulling the songs’ punch or immediacy. It is a very precise musical vision, at once raw and sophisticated, vigorous yet grave.

The lyrics take centerstage. Scherrer creates scenarios – “high-brow cartoons,” he calls them – in which various philosophical and theological problems are set in action. He pits the old enemies against each other: meaning vs. absurdity, redemption vs. ruin, self vs. world, God vs. man, man vs. the knowledge of his inevitable death. Everything is at stake. Even that most familiar of lyrical forms, the love song, becomes the site of existential reckoning. The sentiments shift nimbly between pathos and black humor, between the sacred and the scatological, always with a poet’s sensitivity to the music of the phrase.
Venue Information:
The Rhythm Room
1019 E. Indian School Road
Phoenix, AZ, 85014
http://www.rhythmroom.com/