SOUL REBELS

SOUL REBELS

BAD CACTUS BRASS BAND

Thu, September 25, 2014

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$12.00 - $15.00

This event is 21 and over

SOUL REBELS
SOUL REBELS
The SOUL REBELS formed when Lumar LeBlanc and Derrick Moss, originally members of New Orleans' iconic Dejean's Young Olympia Brass Band, decided they wanted to play the new, exciting music they were hearing on the radio while respecting the tradition they loved. Both New Orleans natives, the pair was steeped in the fundamentals of New Orleans jazz, but inevitably, contemporary styles of music began to seep into their psyches.

While LeBlanc attended the famed St. Augustine High School, Moss went to Lil' Wayne's alma mater McMain High School, and paraded alongside soon-to-be Cash Money Records CEO Ronald "Slim" Williams in the school's marching band. New sounds were all around and they found them as exciting as the horn-combo style featured in jazz funerals since the turn of the Twentieth Century.

"We wanted to make our own sound without disrespecting the brass tradition," LeBlanc recalls, "so we knew we had to break away." They found a stylistic middle ground when they spun off and formed a band of young, like-minded local players from all over New Orleans. Graduates of university music programs throughout the South, the band took the marching band format they had learned in school and incorporated influences from outside the city as well as late-breaking local styles – R&B, funk and hip-hop – especially through half-sung, half-rapped lyrics. "Most of our originals have vocals," says LeBlanc. "You wouldn't have done that in a traditional brass band."

Soon, the Soul Rebels' contagious originals and updated takes on standards won them a loyal local audience. They began rocking some of New Orleans' most beloved live music venues. A chance gig opening for the Neville Brothers got them a real start—and an official name. It was youngest brother Cyril Neville who first called them "Soul Rebels," a good name for a band that strived to incite positive change in its treasured musical heritage. Since those days, the band has settled on an eight-piece lineup, building a career around an eclectic live show that harnesses the power of horns and drums in the party-like atmosphere of a dance club. Their weekly show at Uptown New Orleans spot Le Bon Temps Roulé has been known to descend into a sweaty shout-along as the band mixes up songs from its five studio albums with hits by Jay-Z and OutKast.

While touring the U.S., the Soul Rebels have shared the stage with notable artists from many corners of the pop and jazz worlds, including Arcade Fire, The Roots, Bootsy Collins, Robert Plant & Jimmy Page, Counting Crows, Green Day, Drive By Truckers, James Brown, Roy Hargrove, Allen Toussaint, Chuck Brown, Terence Blanchard, The Gap Band, Better than Ezra and many more. Averaging around 250 shows per year, the Soul Rebels have brought the party to stages as far away as South Africa and Europe, playing some of the world's best-known music events, including, Umbria Jazz Fest, Antibes Jazz Festival, The Montreal Jazz festival, Bonnaroo, the Wanee Festival and, of course, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.

When Hurricane Katrina struck their hometown in 2005, the band scattered across the region. Though a few members relocated to cities in Texas, the band frequently reconvened for gigs in New Orleans, this time with a renewed purpose. "Music has been the number one vehicle for Katrina recovery," says LeBlanc. "That catastrophe has brought so much world wide attention to our music."

Indeed, since the storm, the band has been more successful than ever serving as an international ambassador of the New Orleans sound. Now a hardcore touring band with a solid-as-ever lineup, the band has recently represented its hometown on television, appearing in the season finale of the HBO series Treme, the Discovery Channel hit After the Catch, and the NBC broadcast of the parade before the Saints' winning 2010 Super Bowl.

In January of 2012, the band will finally release its first international album, Unlock Your Mind, on Rounder Records. This new song-driven studio effort includes guest appearances by Cyril Neville, Trombone Shorty and Meters guitarist Leo Nocentelli. The album was produced by Rounder VP of A&R Scott Billington, who was also at the helm of many of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band's groundbreaking albums.

The Soul Rebels continue charting new territory today. Called "the missing link between Public Enemy and Louis Armstrong" by the Village Voice, the Soul Rebels combine top notch musicianship and songs with grooves that celebrate life in time-honored New Orleans style.
BAD CACTUS BRASS BAND
BAD CACTUS BRASS BAND
The Bad Cactus Brass Band is a New Orleans Second Line street jazz band based in Phoenix, Arizona. Founded by sousaphonist Benjie Messer, their members include many of the fieriest jazz musicians in the Phoenix area.

Their repertoire includes original dance music, funky street beats, traditional dixieland, gospel and swing, and pop songs reinterpreted with a brass band sound. Powered by tuba, drums, trumpets, saxophones, and trombones, the Bad Cactus Brass Band brings a Mardi Gras energy to street corners, festivals, parties, nightclubs, weddings, and funerals.

Notable Accomplishments:

Bad Cactus Brass Band burst onto the Phoenix scene in 2009, and within a year their distinctive take on New Orleans jazz and funk had become a prominent voice of the city. Their joyful energy and second line traditions have graced many of the area's biggest festivals, including Phoenix's Fabulous Fourth of July, Tempe's Fiesta Bowl Block Party, Tempe Oktoberfest, Glendale Glitters, the Scottsdale Arts Festival, the Desert Botanical Garden's Luminaria Nights, and free concert series put on Centers for the Arts in Scottsdale, Mesa, and Chandler. They have have been featured on radio and television and have marched in the Phoenix Annual Parade of the Arts and the Phoenix Saint Patrick's Day Parade. Their performances at charitable events have been sponsored by corporate giving programs of Phoenix's most successful companies. They worked with the Downtown Phoenix Partnership to found the Downtown Phoenix Mardi Gras Parade and Festival in 2011, and have provided entertainment for many of the Valley's other Mardi Gras-themed events. In 2012, the New Times named them Phoenix's best traditional New Orleans brass band.

Always on the lookout for new experiences, Bad Cactus Bass Band has performed at elementary schools, picnics, churches, theaters, pep rallies, talent shows, farmers markets, ASU fairs, fraternity parties, pub crawls, block parties, house parties, nightclubs, Chinese restaurants, burlesque shows, weddings, Suns games, casino nights, benefit and charity concerts, Christmas tree lightings, grand openings, corporate luncheons, industry expos, anniversaries, senior centers, and funerals. They have appeared at German events as a polka band, at Jewish events as a klezmer band, and at the Phoenix ComiCon as the world's first New Orleans-style chiptune band. They have performed on street corners, on the light rail, on escalators and in elevators, in record stores and libraries. Musical guerillas, they have paraded uninvited into clubs, stores, and several breakfast establishments before 6:00 AM.

Bad Cactus Brass Band has released two albums, Arizona Mardi Gras and Christmas Cactus. They have toured as far as Moab, Utah, and have opened for the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, as well as many of Arizona's most exciting young bands, including Dry River Yacht Club, Captain Squeegee, and the Sugar Thieves.
Venue Information:
The Rhythm Room
1019 E. Indian School Road
Phoenix, AZ, 85014
http://www.rhythmroom.com/