XIU XIU

XIU XIU

TEARIST, FAREWELL (Jamie from Xiu Xiu solo)

Mon, March 24, 2014

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Cancelled

Cancelled

This event is 21 and over

XIU XIU
XIU XIU
Rarely is so much meaning conveyed in the space of six letters. And with regard to Xiu Xiu, its applications are infinite: always relevant, always provocative, always surprising, always evolving, always glittering.

It’s fitting, then, that as Jamie Stewart’s ever-evolving band marks a decade in existence, such a powerful sentiment would serve as the title of its latest album.

At its core, Always symbolizes the mutual camaraderie with and deep dedication to each person who has internalized Xiu Xiu’s work, tattooed its name on their skin or soul, and throughout the past ten years made the band a part of their lives.

The origin of these intense, everlasting bonds is Stewart. His fearless lyrics have given voice to life’s most untouchable and taboo subjects, while his distinctively committed but hushed vocals crystallize and medicate their unsettling impact.

Those familiar with the band’s work will take particular note of the times Stewart re-visits profoundly personal accounts from his own life—most prominently on “Beauty Towne” (a not-so-uplifting postscript to the muddle of those depicted in “Clowne Towne” from 2004’s Fabulous Muscles) and “Black Drum Machine” (which finishes the narrative of incest and molestation begun on “Black Keyboard” from 2008’s Women as Lovers).

Elsewhere, Stewart’s willingness to broach any subject finds him confronting both the topical and the intimate in equally meaningful ways: “Gul Mudin” seeks to bring comfort to an Afghani teenage boy murdered for sport by American soldiers; “Joey’s Song” strives to do the same for Stewart’s brother in the aftermath of a family tragedy.

“Factory Girls” chronicles the sexual objectification and desperate existence of Chinese female, migrant workers. “I Luv Abortion,” featuring perhaps Stewart’s most unhinged vocal ever, careens through the resolute heartache of a friend too young to be pregnant and seeks to personalize this most political issue.

But while such writing is worthy of reverence, Always’ most arresting moments lie in its sonic innovation—transforming avant pop elements from an undertone into a bright black focal point while adding new influences such as choral music, kraut rock and animal field recordings.

Produced by Deerhoof’s Greg Saunier (who also contributes drums and vocals to the album) and mixed by John Congleton (Antony and the Johnsons, Marylin Manson, the Roots) the album is positively vibrant.

During recording, Stewart saw a Bible verse spray painted on the wall of his gym. He interpreted the verse to mean, “Horror and beauty are the same; love and hate are the same, the tireless dread of our own lives and of living can be embraced with the same fervency as what we find beautiful.”

Composed of this essence, the album proves that perhaps the only six letters to carry the same weight as “always” are these: Xiu Xiu.
TEARIST
TEARIST
Yasmine Kittles, who says she's influenced by Artaud's Theatre Of Cruelty (etc.) is the primary focus of Tearist, her L.A. PPM (and Pictureplane)-stamped duo with ex-Silver Daggers/No Age touring member William Strangeland on synthesizers. If you've seen them live, and watched Kittles smash and scrape metal while singing for her life, you'll understand why. Documenting that live energy, Living isn't a typical debut LP: The songs here are a collection of "audience recordings made in warehouses, lofts, [and] concert halls." As they explain it, "multiple versions and performance tapes are spliced, mashed, layered, collapsed and collaged to create an organically flowing album. Full songs cut with snippets and interludes capture the band in its early formation." They reference Suicide, Sonic Youth, the Stooges' Metallic K.O., etc., in the proces
Venue Information:
The Rhythm Room
1019 E. Indian School Road
Phoenix, AZ, 85014
http://www.rhythmroom.com/